Evaluation of Bone Mineral Quality by Phalangeal Quantitative Ultrasound in Perinatally HIV-Infected Youths


ABSTRACT

Decreased bone mass density (BMD) is now recognized as an emerging metabolic complication of HIV infection. Several studies have well described the elevated bone turnover in BMD among HIV-infected people. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) assesses skeletal status by measuring the amplitude-dependent speed of sound (AD-SoS, m/s) and the bone transmission time (BTT, μs). This technique is safe, easy to use, radiation-free and “friendly”, for these characteristics it is particularly indicated among children. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effects of HIV infection on bone quality by phalangeal QUS in a young population of perinatally HIV-Infected children: 44 patients (23 females, 21 males; aged 3-17 years) were examined and compared with a control population (1227 healty children, 641 males and 586 females; aged 3-16 years). All patients were vertically infected, 7 patients were CDC stage C, 18 B, and 18 A; considering the antiretroviral treatments 4 were naive to any therapy, 7 were taking two NRTIs, and 32 were on HAART. QUS values were significantly lower in cases than in controls, even after adjustment for age and body size. The associations of AD-SoS and BTT with age, skeletal age SDS, height, and therapy duration were statistically significant. Gender, type of therapy, and CDC stages were not associated to AD-SoS and BTT. This article suggests that QUS measurements could be an attractive option for the evaluation of bone quality in HIV-infected children.
Key words: Bone Quality, HIV, Youth


Articolo presente in – HAART and correlated pathologies n. 0

Download the article download_pdf